Jason deCaires Taylor art

Posted On April 5, 2014 By In Buzzworthy, The Scene

Discover A Whole New Underwater World

 
 

Today, over 40% of the world’s population of coral reefs has been completely destroyed. The loss of these ecosystems creates significant social, economic, cultural, and ecological problems for humans worldwide. Eco-sculptor Jason deCaires Taylor saw this problem, and began a creative and artistic project to help slow down the destruction and rebuild ocean communities. Underneath the surface of the water in Cancun, Mexico lies a living and ever-changing museum of sculptures. Taylor chose specific areas for his sculptures to act as artificial reefs to attract corals, increase marine biomass and aggregate fish species. In doing so, he also draws scuba diving tourists away from endangered reefs to view his beautiful and striking sculptures. The amazing feature of his art is that it is constantly changing due to the effects of the environment. Taylor explains his work symbolizes the symbiosis between man and nature, balancing messages of hope and loss.

photo of sculpture

photo of sculptures

A look at how his work has changed over the years.

Taylor’s sculptures are made with environmentally-friendly materials that help to promote coral growth. Many of the pieces are designed specifically for certain kinds of plant life and animal life. By using the underwater world as his pallet, Taylor feels his work has a multi-dimensional and multi-sensual experience. “Taking art off of the white walls of a gallery offers the viewer a sense of discovery and participation,” says Taylor. Everything is magnified 25% underwater and light refracts to create color changes similar to a kaleidoscopic effect. He’s designed his work “to promote the regeneration of marine life and to use sculpture as a means of conveying hope and awareness of the plight of our oceans.”

photo of sculpture

photo of sculpture

photo of sculpture

photo of sculptures

picture of sculptures

photo of sculptures

photo of sculptures

photo of sculptures

In my opinion, this is an amazingly beautiful way for an activist to help endangered ocean life. See more of his work here.

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Renée Rapin is a writer for Writtalin. Renée is a UCSB grad and currently works as an event coordinator. She is a terrible speller and has an unhealthy obsession with dinosaurs, wine, and reading. In her spare time she enjoys people watching, sweating at the gym, and planning for book club. Hopefully you find her worldly observations as entertaining as she does. You can email Renée at: reneer@writtalin.com

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